Archive for June, 2009


Native Americans Against Obama- White Bullets

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Native Americans Against Obama – White Bullets

Native Americans Against Obama- The Journey

michael jackson – black or white FULL version

Michael Jackson-Billie Jean-30th Anniversary Special

Michael Jackson “Man in the Mirror”

My Generation

 

I know this is normally a political blog, but today I will stray just a little.  The death of Michael Jackson is all over the news,  and I would like to share my thoughts.  I remember as a young child, sitting on my front porch looking out of the smoky Appalachian mountains and listening to WSM radio out of Chicago.  In those days am radio traveled a very long way, and only at night could you pick up the station.  I heard Micheal, before I was 11 years old, and had no idea the color of his skin. 

The first song I heard was ABC, unlike many of the younger fans, I loved the music before he was the king of pop.  Through the years, I was glad a man of color was so talented and famous.  He crossed races, and genders, before most other artist.  He was the Fred Astaire of my generation. 

During the years, and the endless court cases, I was never able to know if he was or was not guilty.  Not that it matters now, what matters is his music, talent and memories we all have of Micheal.  May the great spirit bless his soul.

Native Americans Against Obama-Promises Kept

Cap & Tax

Today, this  a bill passed the house, it now goes on to the senate.  Call washintong, send emails tell them not to pass this!  Today, as the economy is in meltdown, this only adds to the misery. 

This bill will keep us, in a permanant state of poverty, unemployment and higer taxes.  Obama has kept his promises, he has not raised taxes on 95% of Americans.  But this is a hidden tax, and we all will pay for it.

In his own words, BEFORE Obama was elected, he said he would do this.  He would force us not to use energy.  Don’t get me wrong, it would be great if we were ready to change over to green energy.  But the truth is, we are not.  If you work in the coal, oil or gas industry, and still have a job you won’t for long.

This will only add to the miserys we have today.  How long we will let Congress and Obama, ruin our country?  There will be no way to turn this around, once it is signed into law.   Please contact your Congressmen, now!  Guess who gets rich from this bill?  Thats right, Acorn, and Wallstreet will get lots!  Goldman sacks and everyone on wall street, it is another bail out for them, basied on the backs of us! 

Please do not let Congress turn America into one big Indian Reservation!  Poor, and unemployed!

Timepassages

Poverty USA – Native Americans – 16 Nov 07

Native Americans Against Obama- Through Different Eyes

Through Different Eyes

Today, I see things through different eyes. I write this from a motel not far from the Wind River Reservation. Today, I attended a pow wow at the Buffalo Bill Museum in Cody, Wyoming. On the way to the pow wow, I drove through Wind River Canyon. This is truly one of the most beautiful places on earth, from the snow capped mountains to the winding rivers, it is a site to be seen. It is as though you have stepped back in time, the land looks as though it was truly touched by the hand of the great spirit. The white water rapids, roll along the river, and eagles fly high above.

 Along the river are three tipis, and you can almost imagine the ancestors stepping out from them. But, today something changed for me, something that is difficult to describe. I must start my story in the past, 16 years ago to be exact. It was 1992, and I had a dream. Most of the time, I pay little attention to such things. But this was different, and I knew it. The problem was not that I had a dream, the problem was it would not go away. It lasted night after night for almost a month. Silently taunting me, and leaving me more confused with each passing day.

I guess I should explain it, as best I can. It is still today as clear in my mind as it was 16 years ago. It began with me standing on a great prairie, with brown grass almost to my knees. The grass was blowing and leaning in the wind. I looked and the grass seemed to go on and on, as if it had no end. I looked down at my dress, it was homespun made from the butternut color. The dresses was long and covered my feet, I pulled the dress up, and saw I had no shoes. I also noticed my hands, they were darkened from the sun, and appeared to be much older than I was at that time. I wore no jewelry, that I could see, which was odd, as I always wore jewelry.

To my left was a tall wooden wall, I looked down the wall, and also could find no end. Then a large door open from within the wall itself. Then, out stepped a man, dressed in all white buckskin. He was tall and worn one lone eagle feather in the left side of his long black hair. The man reached his hand out to me, and I took it. He then lead me through the door, and into a strange scene. To my left, were many women and children, the women were all dressed like me. Long cotton dresses, that appeared to be from sometime in the 1800’s. They were all Native Americans, that was clear, and they were cooking over open fires, with large black cooking pots handing from three legged tri-pods. All the while children ran around chasing each other and playing. But the strange thing was the silence, no one made a sound, it was as if they could not see me, nor the man dressed in white.

So, as I am walking I kept asking the man, “who are these people?” He did not answer, so I asked “why can’t they hear me?” Again, he did not answer, it was then I knew they were dead. I became frightened, and confused as to why this man was showing me all these dead people. Finally we got to the end of the people, and the man turned to me, and said, “feel the pain.”

The dream was always the same and returned night after night. Each time I awoke in tears, but had no idea why. So, I talked to me pastor, in hopes he could help to bring me peace. I explained the dream, and he told me it was nothing. Not to worry it would stop. I asked if there was a meaning to this dream, and he told me “no.” So I sought out other pastors, and was also told, it meant nothing. But, the dreams continued, night after night.

At this point almost a month had passed, and I needed a answer. To find some way to make these stop, needless to say my family thought I had lost my mind. Finally I located a elder from my tribe, and picked up the phone and called him. I had been told, he could help me and give me peace. I told him about the dream, and he did have an answer. He explained the man in white was a holy man, more than likely one of my ancestors. He said that, I needed to feel the pain of my people. And until I did that, I would not have peace.

 I have to admit, I really was not sure what he meant. There was so much pain in the past of our culture, I did not know where to start. But, I did start by visiting the graves of my people, and my ancestors. I learned as much as I could, looked at the Dawes rolls, and any and all death or census records I could find. Then suddenly the dreams stopped as suddenly as the started.

I went on this trip, to relax and enjoy myself. To try to forget the horrors of Pine Ridge and the poverty of the children. I hoped to put behind me the death of Ta’Shon, and enjoy myself. But that did not happen. I pulled off the road at Wind River Canyon, and saw what a shame it was that this was not “our country”. I saw the stolen land, the murders and the sickness of all of our people. I saw what was done to us, in all the beauty, I saw sadness.

 I got back in my car, and tears streamed down my checks all the way through Wind River. When I arrived at Cody, I parked my car, my husband and I went into the pow wow. I could hear the drums, and the bells. They always make me feel proud, and I love the sound. It is almost like they have taken me to another time and another place. But this time it was different.

As we walked, we passed a tipi, and there were lots of tourist, and lots of dancers. I noticed a man and women, and a dancer. They walked up to him, and asked it they would get a picture with him in front of the tipi. It would seem inocent to most, but today was different. I watched as they stood next the the dancer, and posed for the picture.

At that moment, I looked into the eyes of the dancer and felt his pain. I was angry and sad, he was a sideshow freak to the tourist. Over the course of the next few hours I saw it again and again. Each time, inside I was screaming, they are not freaks, they are people! I wanted to grab them and tell them to stop! This is our heritage, and our country, and we are not freaks, or a character from a western novel.

This is the lesson I learned, and how I saw the pow wow and Wind River through different eyes.

times passages

Glenn Beck: The Letter 1

Glenn Beck: The Letter 2

Glenn Beck: The Letter

Audio Available: 

 

 

June 17, 2009 – 10:36 ET

Related Links

Sign the petition: An open letter to our nation’s leadership

GLENN: I got a letter from a woman in Arizona. She writes an open letter to our nation’s leadership: I’m a home grown American citizen, 53, registered Democrat all my life. Before the last presidential election I registered as a Republican because I no longer felt the Democratic Party represents my views or works to pursue issues important to me. Now I no longer feel the Republican Party represents my views or works to pursue issues important to me. The fact is I no longer feel any political party or representative in Washington represents my views or works to pursue the issues important to me. There must be someone. Please tell me who you are. Please stand up and tell me that you are there and that you’re willing to fight for our Constitution as it was written. Please stand up now. You might ask yourself what my views and issues are that I would horribly feel so disenfranchised by both major political parties. What kind of nut job am I? Will you please tell me?

 

Well, these are briefly my views and issues for which I seek representation:

One, illegal immigration. I want you to stop coddling illegal immigrants and secure our borders. Close the underground tunnels. Stop the violence and the trafficking in drugs and people. No amnesty, not again. Been there, done that, no resolution. P.S., I’m not a racist. This isn’t to be confused with legal immigration.

Glenn Beck’s Common Sense
Now available in book stores nationwide…

Two, the TARP bill, I want it repealed and I want no further funding supplied to it. We told you no, but you did it anyway. I want the remaining unfunded 95% repealed. Freeze, repeal.

Three: Czars, I want the circumvention of our checks and balances stopped immediately. Fire the czars. No more czars. Government officials answer to the process, not to the president. Stop trampling on our Constitution and honor it.

Four, cap and trade. The debate on global warming is not over. There is more to say.

Five, universal healthcare. I will not be rushed into another expensive decision. Don’t you dare try to pass this in the middle of the night and then go on break. Slow down!

Six, growing government control. I want states rights and sovereignty fully restored. I want less government in my life, not more. Shrink it down. Mind your own business. You have enough to take care of with your real obligations. Why don’t you start there.

Seven, ACORN. I do not want ACORN and its affiliates in charge of our 2010 census. I want them investigated. I also do not want mandatory escrow fees contributed to them every time on every real estate deal that closes. Stop the funding to ACORN and its affiliates pending impartial audits and investigations. I do not trust them with taking the census over with our taxpayer money. I don’t trust them with our taxpayer money. Face up to the allegations against them and get it resolved before taxpayers get any more involved with them. If it walks like a duck and talks like a duck, hello. Stop protecting your political buddies. You work for us, the people. Investigate.

Eight, redistribution of wealth. No, no, no. I work for my money. It is mine. I have always worked for people with more money than I have because they gave me jobs. That is the only redistribution of wealth that I will support. I never got a job from a poor person. Why do you want me to hate my employers? Why ‑‑ what do you have against shareholders making a profit?

Nine, charitable contributions. Although I never got a job from a poor person, I have helped many in need. Charity belongs in our local communities, where we know our needs best and can use our local talent and our local resources. Butt out, please. We want to do it ourselves.

Ten, corporate bailouts. Knock it off. Sink or swim like the rest of us. If there are hard times ahead, we’ll be better off just getting into it and letting the strong survive. Quick and painful. Have you ever ripped off a Band‑Aid? We will pull together. Great things happen in America under great hardship. Give us the chance to innovate. We cannot disappoint you more than you have disappointed us.

Eleven, transparency and accountability. How about it? No, really, how about it? Let’s have it. Let’s say we give the buzzwords a rest and have some straight honest talk. Please try ‑‑ please stop manipulating and trying to appease me with clever wording. I am not the idiot you obviously take me for. Stop sneaking around and meeting in back rooms making deals with your friends. It will only be a prelude to your criminal investigation. Stop hiding things from me.

Twelve, unprecedented quick spending. Stop it now.

Take a breath. Listen to the people. Let’s just slow down and get some input from some nonpoliticians on the subject. Stop making everything an emergency. Stop speed reading our bills into law. I am not an activist. I am not a community organizer. Nor am I a terrorist, a militant or a violent person. I am a parent and a grandparent. I work. I’m busy. I’m busy. I am busy, and I am tired. I thought we elected competent people to take care of the business of government so that we could work, raise our families, pay our bills, have a little recreation, complain about taxes, endure our hardships, pursue our personal goals, cut our lawn, wash our cars on the weekends and be responsible contributing members of society and teach our children to be the same all while living in the home of the free and land of the brave.

I entrusted you with upholding the Constitution. I believed in the checks and balances to keep from getting far off course. What happened? You are very far off course. Do you really think I find humor in the hiring of a speed reader to unintelligently ramble all through a bill that you signed into law without knowing what it contained? I do not. It is a mockery of the responsibility I have entrusted to you. It is a slap in the face. I am not laughing at your arrogance. Why is it that I feel as if you would not trust me to make a single decision about my own life and how I would live it but you should expect that I should trust you with the debt that you have laid on all of us and our children. We did not want the TARP bill. We said no. We would repeal it if we could. I am sure that we still cannot. There is such urgency and recklessness in all of the recent spending.

From my perspective, it seems that all of you have gone insane. I also know that I am far from alone in these feelings. Do you honestly feel that your current pursuits have merit to patriotic Americans? We want it to stop. We want to put the brakes on everything that is being rushed by us and forced upon us. We want our voice back. You have forced us to put our lives on hold to straighten out the mess that you are making. We will have to give up our vacations, our time spent with our children, any relaxation time we may have had and money we cannot afford to spend on you to bring our concerns to Washington. Our president often knows all the right buzzword is unsustainable. Well, no kidding. How many tens of thousands of dollars did the focus group cost to come up with that word? We don’t want your overpriced words. Stop treating us like we’re morons.

We want all of you to stop focusing on your reelection and do the job we want done, not the job you want done or the job your party wants done. You work for us and at this rate I guarantee you not for long because we are coming. We will be heard and we will be represented. You think we’re so busy with our lives that we will never come for you? We are the formerly silent majority, all of us who quietly work , pay taxes, obey the law, vote, save money, keep our noses to the grindstone and we are now looking up at you. You have awakened us, the patriotic spirit so strong and so powerful that it had been sleeping too long. You have pushed us too far. Our numbers are great. They may surprise you. For every one of us who will be there, there will be hundreds more that could not come. Unlike you, we have their trust. We will represent them honestly, rest assured. They will be at the polls on voting day to usher you out of office. We have cancelled vacations. We will use our last few dollars saved. We will find the representation among us and a grassroots campaign will flourish. We didn’t ask for this fight. But the gloves are coming off. We do not come in violence, but we are angry. You will represent us or you will be replaced with someone who will. There are candidates among us when hewill rise like a Phoenix from the ashes that you have made of our constitution.

Democrat, Republican, independent, libertarian. Understand this. We don’t care. Political parties are meaningless to us. Patriotic Americans are willing to do right by us and our Constitution and that is all that matters to us now. We are going to fire all of you who abuse power and seek more. It is not your power. It is ours and we want it back. We entrusted you with it and you abused it. You are dishonorable. You are dishonest. As Americans we are ashamed of you. You have brought shame to us. If you are not representing the wants and needs of your constituency loudly and consistently, in spite of the objections of your party, you will be fired. Did you hear? We no longer care about your political parties. You need to be loyal to us, not to them. Because we will get you fired and they will not save you. If you do or can represent me, my issues, my views, please stand up. Make your identity known. You need to make some noise about it. Speak up. I need to know who you are. If you do not speak up, you will be herded out with the rest of the sheep and we will replace the whole damn congress if need be one by one. We are coming. Are we coming for you? Who do you represent? What do you represent? Listen. Because we are coming. We the people are coming.

 

Native Americans Against Obama- Ta’Shon’s Story

By BY MARY CLARE JALONICK
The Associated Press
Updated 9:41 PM Sunday, June 14, 2009
CROW AGENCY, Mont. — Ta’Shon Rain Little Light, a happy little girl who loved to dance and dress up in traditional American Indian clothes, had stopped eating and walking. She complained constantly to her mother that her stomach hurt.

When Stephanie Little Light took her daughter to the Indian Health Service clinic in this wind-swept and remote corner of Montana, they told her the 5-year-old was depressed.

Ta’Shon’s pain rapidly worsened and she visited the clinic about 10 more times over several months before her lung collapsed and she was airlifted to a children’s hospital in Denver. There she was diagnosed with terminal cancer, confirming the suspicions of family members.

A few weeks later, a charity sent the whole family to Disney World so Ta’Shon could see Cinderella’s Castle, her biggest dream. She never got to see the castle, though. She died in her hotel bed soon after the family arrived in Florida.

“Maybe it would have been treatable,” says her great-aunt, Ada White, as she stoically recounts the last few months of Ta’Shon’s short life. Stephanie Little Light cries as she recalls how she once forced her daughter to walk when she was inpain because the doctors told her it was all in the little girl’s head.

Ta’Shon’s story is not unique in the Indian Health Service system, which serves almost 2 million American Indians in 35 states.

On some reservations, the oft-quoted refrain is “don’t get sick after June,” when the federal dollars run out. It’s a sick joke, and a sad one, because it’s sometimes true, especially on the poorest reservations where residents cannot afford health insurance. Officials say they have about half of what they need to operate, and patients know they must be dying or about to lose a limb to get serious care.

Wealthier tribes can supplement the federal health service budget with their own money. But poorer tribes, often those on the most remote reservations, far away from city hospitals, are stuck with grossly substandard care. The agency itself describes a “rationed health care system.”

The sad fact is an old fact, too.

The U.S. has an obligation, based on a 1787 agreement between tribes and the government, to provide American Indians with free health care on reservations. But that promise has not been kept. About one-third more is spent per capita on health care for felons in federal prison, according to 2005 data from the health service.

In Washington, a few lawmakers have tried to bring attention to the broken system as Congress attempts to improve health care for millions of other Americans. But tightening budgets and the relatively small size of the American Indian population have worked against them.

“It is heartbreaking to imagine that our leaders in Washington do not care, so I must believe that they do not know,” Joe Garcia, president of the National Congress of American Indians, said in his annual state of Indian nations’ address in February.

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When it comes to health and disease in Indian country, the statistics are staggering.

American Indians have an infant death rate that is 40 percent higher than the rate for whites. They are twice as likely to die from diabetes, 60 percent more likely to have a stroke, 30 percent more likely to have high blood pressure and 20 percent more likely to have heart disease.

American Indians have disproportionately high death rates from unintentional injuries and suicide, and a high prevalence of risk factors for obesity, substance abuse, sudden infant death syndrome, teenage pregnancy, liver disease and hepatitis.

While campaigning on Indian reservations, presidential candidate Barack Obama cited this statistic: After Haiti, men on the impoverished Pine Ridge and Rosebud Reservations in South Dakota have the lowest life expectancy in the Western Hemisphere.

Those on reservations qualify for Medicare and Medicaid coverage. But a report by the Government Accountability Office last year found that many American Indians have not applied for those programs because of lack of access to the sign-up process; they often live far away or lack computers. The report said that some do not sign up because they believe the government already has a duty to provide them with health care.

The office of minority health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which oversees the Indian Health Service, notes on its Web site that American Indians “frequently contend with issues that prevent them from receiving quality medical care. These issues include cultural barriers, geographic isolation, inadequate sewage disposal and low income.”

Indeed, Indian health clinics often are ill-equipped to deal with such high rates of disease, and poor clinics do not have enough money to focus on preventive care. The main problem is a lack of federal money. American Indian programs are not a priority for Congress, which provided the health service with $3.6 billion this budget year.

Officials at the health service say they can’t legally comment on specific cases such as Ta’Shon’s. But they say they are doing the best they can with the money they have — about 54 cents on the dollar they need.

One of the main problems is that many clinics must “buy” health care from larger medical facilities outside the health service because the clinics are not equipped to handle more serious medical conditions. The money that Congress provides for those contract health care services is rarely sufficient, forcing many clinics to make “life or limb” decisions that leave lower-priority patients out in the cold.

“The picture is much bigger than what the Indian Health Service can do,” says Doni Wilder, an official at the agency’s headquarters in Rockville, Md., and the former director of the agency’s Northwestern region. “Doctors every day in our organization are making decisions about people not getting cataracts removed, gall bladders fixed.”

On the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota, Indian Health Service staff say they are trying to improve conditions. They point out recent improvements to their clinic, including a new ambulance bay. But in interviews on the reservation, residents were eager to share stories about substandard care.

Rhonda Sandland says she couldn’t get help for her advanced frostbite until she threatened to kill herself because of the pain — several months after her first appointment. She says she was exposed to temperatures at more than 50 below, and her hands turned purple. She eventually couldn’t dress herself, she says, and she visited the clinic over and over again, sometimes in tears.

“They still wouldn’t help with the pain so I just told them that I had a plan,” she said. “I was going to sleep in my car in the garage.”

She says the clinic then decided to remove five of her fingers, but a visiting doctor from Bismarck, N.D., intervened, giving her drugs instead. She says she eventually lost the tops of her fingers and the top layer of skin.

The same clinic failed to diagnose Victor Brave Thunder with congestive heart failure, giving him Tylenol and cough syrup when he told a doctor he was uncomfortable and had not slept for several days. He eventually went to a hospital in Bismarck, which immediately admitted him. But he had permanent damage to his heart, which he attributed to delays in treatment. Brave Thunder, 54, died in April while waiting for a heart transplant.

“You can talk to anyone on the reservation and they all have a story,” says Tracey Castaway, whose sister, Marcella Buckley, said she was in $40,000 of debt because of treatment for stomach cancer.

Buckley says she visited the clinic for four years with stomach pains and was given a variety of diagnoses, including the possibility of a tapeworm and stress-related stomachaches. She was eventually told she had Stage 4 cancer that had spread throughout her body.

Ron His Horse is Thunder, chairman of the Standing Rock tribe, says his remote reservation on the border between North Dakota and South Dakota can’t attract or maintain doctors who know what they are doing. Instead, he says, “We get old doctors that no one else wants or new doctors who need to be trained.”

His Horse is Thunder often travels to Washington to lobby for more money and attention, but he acknowledges that improvements are tough to come by.

“We are not one congruent voting bloc in any one state or area,” he said. “So we don’t have the political clout.”

___

On another reservation 200 miles north of Standing Rock, Ardel Baker, a member of North Dakota’s Three Affiliated Tribes, knows all too well the truth behind the joke about money running out.

Baker went to her local clinic with severe chest pains and was sent by ambulance to a hospital more than an hour away. It wasn’t until she got there that she noticed she had a note attached to her, written on U.S. Department of Health and Human Services letterhead.

“Understand that Priority 1 care cannot be paid for at this time due to funding issues,” the letter read. “A formal denial letter has been issued.”

She lived, but she says she later received a bill for more than $5,000.

“That really epitomizes the conflict that we have,” says Robert McSwain, deputy director of the Indian Health Service. “We have to move the patient out, it’s an emergency. We need to get them care.”

It was too late for Harriet Archambault, according to the chairman of the Senate Indian Affairs Committee, Democratic Sen. Byron Dorgan of North Dakota, who has told her story more than once in the Senate.

Dorgan says Archambault died in 2007 after her medicine for hypertension ran out and she couldn’t get an appointment to refill it at the nearest clinic, 18 miles away. She drove to the clinic five times and failed to get an appointment before she died.

Dorgan’s swath of the country is the hardest hit in terms of Indian health care. Many reservations there are poor, isolated, devoid of economic development opportunities and subject to long, harsh winters — making it harder for the health service to recruit doctors to practice there.

While the agency overall has an 18 percent vacancy rate for doctors, that rate jumps to 38 percent for the region that includes the Dakotas. That region also has a 29 percent vacancy rate for dentists, and officials and patients report there is almost no preventive dental care. Routine procedures such as root canals are rarely seen here. If there’s a problem with a tooth, it is simply pulled.

Dorgan has led efforts in Congress to bring attention to the issue. After many years of talking to frustrated patients at home in North Dakota, he says he believes the problems are systemic within the embattled agency: incompetent staffers are transferred instead of fired; there are few staff to handle complaints; and, in some cases, he says, there is a culture of intimidation within field offices charged with overseeing individual clinics.

The senator has also probed waste at the agency.

A 2008 GAO report, along with a follow-up report this year, accused the Indian Health Service of losing almost $20 million in equipment, including vehicles, X-ray and ultrasound equipment and numerous laptops. The agency says some of the items were later found.

Dorgan persuaded Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., to consider an American Indian health improvement bill last year, and the bill passed in the Senate. It would have directed Congress to provide about $35 billion for health programs over the next 10 years, including better access to health care services, screening and mental health programs. A similar bill died in the House, though, after it became entangled in an abortion dispute.

The growing political clout of some remote reservations may bring some attention to health care woes. Last year’s Democratic presidential primary played out in part in the Dakotas and Montana, where both Obama and Democrat Hillary Rodham Clinton became the first presidential candidates to aggressively campaign on American Indian reservations there. Both politicians promised better health care.

Obama’s budget for 2010 includes an increase of $454 million, or about 13 percent, over this year. Also, the stimulus bill he signed this year provided for construction and improvements to clinics.

___

Back in Montana, Ta’Shon’s parents are doing what they can to bring awareness to the issue. They have prepared a slideshow with pictures of her brief life; she is seen dressed up in traditional regalia she wore for dance competitions with a bright smile on her face. Family members approached Dorgan at a Senate field hearing on American Indian health care after her death in 2006, hoping to get the little girl’s story out.

“She was a gift, so bright and comforting,” says Ada White of her niece, whom she calls her granddaughter according to Crow tradition. “I figure she was brought here for a reason.”

Nearby, the clinic on the Crow reservation seems mostly empty, aside from the crowded waiting room. The hospital is down several doctors, a shortage that management attributes recruitment difficulties and the remote location.

Diane Wetsit, a clinical coordinator, said she finds it difficult to think about the congressional bailout for Wall Street.

“I have a hard time with that when I walk down the hallway and see what happens here,” she says.

___

On the Net:

Indian Health Service: http://www.ihs.gov/

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Department’s office of minority health: http://tinyurl.com/l9qzuq

National Congress of American Indians’ health care issues: http://tinyurl.com/krs986

Senate Indian Affairs Committee: http://indian.senate.gov

GAO reports: http://tinyurl.com/ljq6fb, http://tinyurl.com/n7kdpa

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Reality

This is a guest writer for NAAO.    Thanks to the writer for allowing us to us his article. His name is rog mcleod.

 

I am a white man who is thougroughy disgusted by the treatment of American native people. Promises and tereaties have been broken fron the start. It follows through. It’s  been a long time since the natives of this country had a voice. Now is the time to voice yourselves! Like I said I am white but I am totally  disgusted on how my ancestors treated native Americans. My  ancestors were sneaky and underhanded people. I am the opposite of that. The US government has once again turned its back on you. In 1787 it was said that all native people would have free health care courtesy the government.  It has not come true. So for 220 years a promise or treaty has not come true. Native Americans living in the  USA have been shafted! Again! Native American people, stand tall and fight for what was promised to you 220 years ago! You have the right to do it. I will stand by you when you stand up! I am a white man but I know a bit about history and I understand the history and that’s why I will stand with you in victory!

sted

 

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Native Americans Against Obama- Where is our Mr Smith?

Native Americans Against Obama – Where is our Mr Smith?